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Design Research Society Digital Newsletter January 2012
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DESIGN RESEARCH NEWS  Volume 17 Number 1 Jan 2012 ISSN 1473-3862 DRS Digital Newsletter

CONTENTS
 
o   Editorial
o   Design Studies
o   Calls
o   Announcements

o   The Design Research Society: information
o   Digital Services of the DRS
o   Subscribing and unsubscribing to DRN
o   Contributing to DRN


EDITORIAL

This is the first edition this year, and this is the seventeenth year of publishing Design Research News. It's amusing to remember that when we started - that is with Martin Woolley running the listserv and me editing the newsletter - it was intended as a temporary arrangement to tide us over the loss of the DRS's [paper] newsletter which was distributed only to paid up members of the Society. Once we decided to make DRN open to all researchers - whether DRS members or not - numbers of subscribers grew rapidly. There are now over 8,500 of you subscribing and the list continues to grow by a few more each month.

If you are new to DRN, you will find here a mixture of calls and announcements for conferences, books, events, discussion forums, reports, etc. etc. which are related to design research in its many forms.

If you are not already a member of Design Research Society, do please consider joining. DRS has several membership options including an exceptional package for research students. Perhaps I can take this opportunity to mention Fellowship of the Society - this is for experienced researchers in design and related fields, is by peer reviewed application only, and carries the suffix FDRS to denote more senior standing. If any of the membership schemes are of interest to you, please visit the website http://www.designresearchsociety.org

I would also like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very happy new year 2012.

-- David Durling

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DESIGN STUDIES

Contents of Design Studies, Volume 32, Issue 6, November 2011 Special Issue on Interpreting Design Thinking

Susan C. Stewart Editorial: Interpreting Design Thinking Pages 515-520

Kees Dorst The core of 'design thinking' and its application Pages 521-532

Cameron Tonkinwise A taste for practices: Unrepressing style in design thinking Pages 533-545

Anne Burdick, Holly Willis Digital learning, digital scholarship and design thinking Pages 546-556

Janet McDonnell Impositions of order: A comparison between design and fine art practices Pages 557-572

Bec Paton, Kees Dorst Briefing and reframing: A situated practice Pages 573-587

Robin S. Adams, Shanna R. Daly, Llewellyn M. Mann, Gloria Dall'Alba Being a professional: Three lenses into design thinking, acting, and being Pages 588-607

Susan C. Stewart Book Review: Design Thinking: Understanding How Designers Think and Work, Nigel Cross, Berg, Oxford & New York (2011) 163pp., ISBN: 9781847886361 (pb.) 9781847886378 (hb.) Pages 608-609

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/issue/271099-1-s2.0- S0142694X11X00054


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CALLS

 

10-14 July 2012: The International Committee for the History of Technology's 39th Symposium in Barcelona, Technology, the Arts and Industrial Culture

Deadline for proposals is 31 January 2012!

The 39th ICOHTEC Symposium will be held in Catalonia in mid-July next year. The main theme of the meeting will be Technology, the Arts and Industrial Culture. The aim is to examine technology in a multidisciplinary framework. The key questions are how technological development has interacted with design, architecture, the arts as well as popular culture and whether we can regard industrial culture as a melting pot of various influences. Reflecting on the theme of the previous conference we hope also to explore the role of consumers in this dialogue.

Barcelona with its rich industrial history, outstanding architecture and ample collections of the arts will be an excellent site for examining the interactions of technology with the arts, structural and form design as well as culture in general.

ICOHTEC welcomes individual paper and poster proposals as well as the submissions of sessions to this symposium. The tendency is to favour compact and coherent session proposals where pre sentations communicate with each others.

The symposium programme will include scientific and plenary sessions, poster presentations, business meetings and the general assembly of the organising society, excursions, social events such as receptions and a banquet, and possibly pre- and post-conference trips. The premises of the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya will serve as venues for this meeting.

The programme committee suggests the following subthemes for the consideration of session organizers and contributors. The bullet points under the subthemes are simply examples of topics that could fit into the each subtheme.

TECHNOLOGY - AUTONOMOUS, COMMUNICATING OR INTEGRATED POWER IN HISTORY - Society - the master or slave of technology? - The dependence and independence of technology from socio-economic and cultural factors - Examples of technological momentum or path dependence - Origins of technological innovations

DOES TECHNOLOGY DRIVE THE ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE? - Representations of technology in the arts - Technological fundaments for the development of the arts and architecture: - Printing machines in creating modern literature for the masses - Was the industry of synthetic paints a requirement for impressionism? - The celluloid film - a precondition for cinematic art?

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE IN TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT - Surrealistic technology - Representations of arts and architecture in technology

SOUL OF TECHNOLOGY: PERSONIFICATION OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS - Unemotional robots and weeping dolls - Monster cars and lady hammers - masculinity and feminity of technology - RMS Empress of Ireland and Admiral Kuznetsov - gender of ships - Hoovers, wellingtons, mackintoshes ... figurative language of technology

TECHNOLOGY AND CONCEPTIONS OF BEAUTY - Aesthetics of industrial design - Gendered concepts of technological beauty - Changing ideals about how technology should look

COMPONENTS OF INDUSTRIAL CULTURE - Values, habits and group interests in industrial communities - Machines setting the pace for industrial culture - Design and cultural values - Analogies with the old, qualities of the new - The role of arts and architecture in industrial culture - Technology of popular culture: mass production of culture and culture for masses - Heritage in industry and industrial heritage

TECHNOLOGY IN MAKING ENVIRONMENTAL ATMOSPHERES - The effects of industrial pollution on art and architecture - Environmental heritage of technology, arts and architecture

TASTE OF THE INDUSTRY - Industrial arts and the exquisiteness of manufactured goods - The birth and development of industrial design - Mass production of kitsch and vulgar objects - Introduction of new materials and their impacts on the qualities of products

CONSUMERS' IMPACT ON THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN TECHNOLOGY, ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE - Consumer friendly or showy technology - Push or pull? Consumers' choice or producers' power - Inducements to buy: The role of arts and architecture

TECHNOLOGICAL  LITERACY - Cultural differences in comprehending and appreciating technology - Multidisciplinarity in engineering and technical education - Are there national styles in technical education?

The committee will also consider submissions not directly related to the symposium theme as long as they can be regarded to be related to the history of technology broadly defined.

Proposal Guidelines

The symposium covers all periods and all areas of the globe. In keeping with a cherished tradition of the field, the meeting is open to scholars from all disciplines and backgrounds. We especially encourage graduate students to participate in the symposium and submit their proposals (limited travel grants will be available; see further information at: http://www.icohtec.org/resources-prizes.html). Because we aim at quick and equal processing of submissions, paper or poster proposals must be submitted in English. Nevertheless, besides English also French, German, Russian and Spanish are acceptable for paper and poster presentations at the symposium, but the organizers will not provide simultaneous translation during the conference.

We urge contributors to consider organizing a full session of three or more papers. Individual paper submissions will also be considered. In addition, it is possible to propose papers and sessions unrelated to the general theme as well. They can be presented in "Special topics" sessions.

INDIVIDUAL PAPER proposals must include: (1) a 200-400-word abstract; and (2) a one-page CV. Abstracts should include the author's name and email address, a short descriptive title, a concise statement of the thesis, a brief discussion of the sources, and a summary of the major conclusions. If you are submitting a paper proposal dealing with a particular subtheme, please indicate this in your proposal.

In preparing your paper, remember that presentations are not full-length articles. You will have no more than 20 minutes to speak, which is roughly equivalent to eigth double-spaced typed pages. For more suggestions about preparing your conference presentation, please consult the guidelines at the conference website.

Contributors are encouraged to submit full-length versions of their papers after the symposium for consideration by ICOHTEC's journal ICON.

SESSION proposals must include (1) an abstract of the session (200-400 words maximum), listing the proposed papers and a session chairperson; (2) abstracts for each paper (200-400 words); (3) a one-page CV for each contributor and chairperson. Sessions should consist of at least three papers - but no more than - and they may include several sections of three or four papers in each, which might extend series of successive sections over more than one day. The programme committee reserve the right to relocate papers to different themes and add papers to sessions. We also encourage proposing roundtables and other "untraditional" session formats.

POSTER proposals must include (1) a 200-400-word abstract; and (2) a one-page CV. Abstracts should include the author's name and email address, a short descriptive title, a concise statement of the thesis, a brief discussion of the sources, and a summary of the major conclusions. Please, indicate one of the specified subthemes for your poster.

Proposal Submissions The final deadline for all submissions is Tuesday 31 January 2012.

Please, sign up to our online submission system, fill in a form and send your proposal through it. All proposals are to be submitted via our online system. The link to the system is available at our website: http://www.icohtec.org/annual-meeting/cfp-system/2012-barcelona/

If you have any questions related scientific programme, paper, poster or session proposals, please, do not hesitate to contact Jan Kunnas, the chair of the programme committee, via email jan.kunnas@eui.eu

http://www.icohtec.org/annual-meeting/cfp-system/2012-barcelona/


 

6-8 June 2012: Persuasive 2012: Design for health and safety

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 7th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, Linkoeping, SWEDEN

Persuasive Technology is a stimulating interdisciplinary research field that focuses on how interactive technologies and services can be designed to change people's attitudes and behaviors. Influenced by areas such as classic rhetoric, social psychology and ubiquitous computing, researchers in this field are typically designing applications for domains such as health, business, safety, and education. The 7th International Conference on Persuasive Technology (Persuasive 2012) will build on the successful prior conferences held at Eindhoven, Stanford, Oulu, Copenhagen, Claremont, and Columbus. The conference will feature the latest insights into how mobile and internet-based applications such as mobile games and social networking sites can be designed to influence behaviors, thoughts, and feelings. The conference is expected to gather researchers, practitioners, and students who are interested in networking, presenting, discussing and reflecting on central themes associated with persuasive computing and design.

Conference themes

The general theme of Persuasive 2012 - Design for health and safety - sets a special focus on current societal challenges. Themes of the conference include, but are not limited to:

- Behavior change systems for healthy living - Lifestyles management technologies - Eco/Green persuasive technologies - Persuasive design for personal safety - Mass persuasion and safety - Smart environments and augmented reality for behavior change Mobile and ubiquitous persuasion - Motivational technology - Design for education and learning - Robotics and persuasion - Security and privacy - Persuasive design and innovation - Methods, metrics and measurements in persuasive technology - Social and organizational issues - Theoretical foundations of persuasion - Ethics of persuasive technology - e-Interventions for addictions - Evaluation of persuasive technology - Persuasive Technologies in inclusive ICT - Business models for persuasive systems

Formats and submission

We accept submissions as full papers or posters. Full papers are limited to 12 pages in Springer's LNCS format. Posters are limited to 4 pages in Springer's LNCS format. Papers and poster submission accepted for publication will appear in the Lecture Notes in Computer Science Series from Springer Verlag (see http://www.springeronline.com/lncs).

The electronic submission of the full paper or the poster in PDF format must be received on or before January 6, 2012. All papers must be submitted through the conference web page (www.ida.liu.se/conferences/persuasive2012). To support the blind review process, you need to prepare an anonymous version of the paper with author names and affiliations removed. In case you have any problems with the electronic submission, please contact the conference secretariat as early as possible (for contact information, see conference web site www.ida.liu.se/conferences/persuasive2012).

The organizing committee also invites workshop, tutorial, and panel proposals in the field of persuasive technology.

Key dates

Paper submission: January 6, 2012 Author notification: February 10, 2012 Final version submission: March 9, 2012 Author registration: March 30, 2012 Poster submission: February 17, 2012 Workshop, tutorial, and panel proposals: February 10, 2012 Conference: June 6-8, 2012

Conference chair Magnus Bang, Linkoeping University, Sweden

http://www.ida.liu.se/conferences/persuasive2012


 

7-9 June 2012: DCC12 Fifth International Conference on Design Computing and Cognition Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA

7-9 June 2012 Conference 5-6 June 2012 Workshops

CALL FOR PAPERS, POSTERS AND WORKSHOPS

Paper Abstracts (optional) 1 December 2011 Papers (full - 20 pages) 6 January 2012 Posters (abstracts) 3 February 2012 Workshop proposals 3 February 2012

This biennial conference series provides an international forum for the presentation and discussion of state-of-the-art and cutting-edge design research with a focus on artificial intelligence, cognitive science and computational theories in design. The conference proceedings will form a continuing archive of design computing and cognition research. The conference will be preceded by a series of half-day workshops on specialist topics in design computing and cognition.

Researchers from all fields employing computation and or cognition in design are invited to participate.

A set of research papers that has been refereed by an international board of reviewers will be presented and published as a book. Posters describing ongoing research will be presented. Workshops provide a forum for the discussion of specialist topics.

Details at: http://mason.gmu.edu/~jgero/conferences/dcc12/


 

A relatively new book series with the MIT Press, which aims to publish shorter books whose focus concentrates on the interstices between science, technology, and the environment.

Our series, "History for a Sustainable Future," is actively seeking authors who might have material that fits the series.

Series Overview

It is hardly hyperbole to assert that we live in a state of environmental crisis.  Human-induced climate change is already threatening plant and animal biodiversity and human habitats. Globally, there is an uneven distribution of environmental amenities and hazards.  Our food and our bodies are increasingly burdened with a cocktail of toxic chemicals.  Human population growth is seriously challenging the planet's carrying capacity. And we are consuming ever more natural resources at an unsustainable rate.  At the same time, collective human ingenuity is introducing new forms of science, technology, economy, politics, and practices that seek to address and remediate these problems.  These environmental engagements [both positive and negative] have histories that are ingrained in a human social, political, and technological past that we have yet to fully understand.  But in order to fully understand the social, political, economic, and ecological context of contemporary environmental issues we need to be conscious of their historical contexts.  Resolving local and global environmental quandaries requires careful thought and planning; future success depends upon a deeper appreciation of the past.  This is the point: historicizing sustainable and unsustainable futures is based less on the notion that we should learn from past mistakes than on the premise that solving the environmental crisis will demand the most and best information available, and history provides valuable insight into the creation and proliferation of the environmental ills we hope to curb.

History for a Sustainable Future [a new series from the MIT Press] means to publish short, peer-reviewed monographs that provide valuable historical context that illuminates the nature of the current landscape of environmental problems, innovations, decisions, and futures before us.  The series takes as its primary mission the dissemination of accessible historical information and resources for scholars and teachers, policy makers, activists, and concerned citizens.  The driving theme behind this series involves making environmental history more relevant to 21st-century concerns about the environment.

Building on the notion that history offers a vital perspective on contemporary environmental debate, History for a Sustainable Future solicits proposals and manuscripts that engage with environmental histories that speak directly to the broader complexity of contemporary environmental issues.  Accessible writing and clarity of purpose will serve as the cornerstone for titles under consideration; manuscripts should be theory-influenced, but not theory-laden.  The series distinguishing features stem from its interest in producing short titles that contribute to environmental history's contemporary relevance.  Books will be limited to 50000 words (including notes and references) and firmly grounded in original, primary research.  The editorial board also solicits and encourages co-authored works that draw on the multiple strengths made possible by the perspectives and expertise of more than a single author.  While the series values timeliness, proposed topics and their delivery should have a lasting quality.  In order for a manuscript to be considered for this series, it must speak very directly to contemporary environmental issues while remaining firmly grounded in historical analysis and methodologies. In addition to their topicality, manuscript submissions must meet an exceptionally high standard of writing quality, scholarship, and accessibility to our stated audiences.

Series Editor: Michael Egan, McMaster University <egan@mcmaster.ca>


 

11-14 September 2012: Design & Emotion London 2012 "Out of Control" Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design

The organising committee of the 8th International Design & Emotion Conference, London, 11th-14th September 2012, is very pleased to invite you to participate in this conference.

Overview This conference is a forum held every other year where practitioners, academics and industry leaders meet and exchange knowledge and insights concerning the cross-disciplinary field of design and emotion. We are looking for researchers, academics and practitioners to submit proposals for the following:

1) Paper submissions Full Papers are expected to contribute widely applicable long-lasting knowledge to the dis- cipline. Accepted papers will be presented in the conference programme and published in the proceedings. The paper length is a maximum of 12 pages (approximately 4,000-5,000 words plus figures and tables) in the specified format, which will be detailed on the website (including a template).

Short Papers (Posters) are expected to describe research that is more appropriate for the interactive poster session. The paper length should be a maximum of 5 pages (approxi- mately 2,000 words plus figures and tables) and an additional page containing a full-page image of the poster in the specified format for the publication in the conference proceed- ings. The first submission requires a short paper manuscript without the poster page.

2) Case Studies Case studies are invited for submission to present design projects that address issues and insights in design and emotion, or to communicate and discuss your approach to enhance emotional effects. These must include a summary description in a maximum of 5 pages (ap- proximately 2,000 words) in the specified format and a maximum of 30 slides illustrating the design, design process and use.

3) Workshops & Masterclasses Workshops & Masterclasses of either a full or half-day will be held on 11th September 2012 prior to the main programme of the conference. The purpose is to provide a platform for presenting and discussing novel ideas and emerging issues in a less formal way than the conference itself. The format of each workshop/masterclass is to be determined by its organiser, but each one is expected to include ample time for general discussion.

Theme & Topics While Design & Emotion is the overarching focus of the conference--allowing us to consider all aspects of the relationship between human experience and design understood in its widest senses--the theme this year is "Out of Control".

For a number of years, uncertainty, crisis and chaos have been keywords describing the experience of many of us. A world driven by uncertainty, crisis and chaos demands different responses from design (as a community, a practice and a process). On one hand we can mitigate against these--designing systems which can withstand, or manage, the challenges they produce. Here there is a focus upon design as a "problem-solving" activity. On the other, we can use them as springboards to a creative future. In this way, design as "opportunity mapping" becomes important.

We would like to encompass both of these approaches to design and to examine how they impact upon, or are generated by, the whole spectrum of human emotion experienced at the macro (socio-cultural), micro (personal), meta (philosophical), processural (methodological) and strategic levels.

This conference is open to any theoretical, empirical or methodological work on Design & Emotion and we are particularly interested in receiving papers from researchers, academics and practitioners in the following topic areas (though they are by no means exhaustive and other work relevant to the theme will be considered):

Society/Culture - Socially Responsive/Responsible Design - Design for Behavioural Change - Design & Space/Environment - Design for Digital Media - Corporate Social Responsibility - The Self/The Object - Design & Identity - Design & Well-Being (inc. food, healthcare & love) - Design & Illusion, Fake & Fraud - User Experience (inc. Human Factors & HCI) - Experience Design

The Philosophical - Design without Emotion Design - Affect & the Materiality of Experience Design - Magic & Enchantment

Processes, Methodologies, Tools & Methods - Research Methodologies - Theoretical Foundations - Empirical Approaches

Design, Strategy & Innovation - Design & the Future (foresight/trends) - Designing Services - Business Experience - Branding

Submission and Review Process Submission and review processes will be handled by our conference system. All submissions will go through a blind-review process with at least two reviewers considering each proposal. All submissions accepted in the second review will be asked to submit the final manuscripts in the camera-ready format. The detailed authoring guideline will be available on the conference website.

Important Dates 1st February 2012  Papers & Case Study submissions 15th April 2012   Notification of Acceptance Papers & Case Studies 1st May 2012   Workshops/Masterclasses submissions 15th May 2012   Final Paper submissions 1st June 2012   Notification of Acceptance

Workshops/Masterclasses 15th June 2012   Final Acceptance 15th July 2012   Early Registration 11th September 2012   Workshops/Masterclasses 12th-14th September 2012  Conference

de2012@csm.arts.ac.uk


 

(In)Visible Culture: E-Journal for Visual Culture

Deadline: Jan 15, 2012

(In)visible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture is soliciting reviews for Issue 18, Making Sense of Visual Culture. With this issue, we will launch an expanded Reviews section, for which we now seek submission. The articles in Making Sense of Visual Culture draw on presentations from a conference hosted In April 2011 by the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester.  In April we addressed institutional questions about the field of Visual Culture and explored new approaches for researching an expanded range of sensory objects, phenomena, and practices beyond the visual. More information about the conference can be accessed here: http://makingsenseconference.com/

IVC's Reviews section for Issue 18 is soliciting reviews that investigate a broader range of sensory experience beyond visual analysis.  Reviews will be chosen for their ability to complement this issue's theme.

We encourage reviews that draw upon theoretical texts to assess art exhibitions, films, architecture, television, landscape (either urban or rural), maps, food, games, websites, magazines, music, dance, performance, conferences, lectures, fashion shows, sporting events, political campaigns or any other types of events that promise to expand the scope and tools of Visual Culture.

Please send inquiries and completed texts (MLA style), maximum 1000 words, to invisibleculturereviews@gmail.com by January 15, 2012.

*?(In)visible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to explorations of the material and political dimensions of cultural practices: the means by which cultural objects and communities are produced, the historical contexts in which they emerge, and the regimes of knowledge or modes of social interaction to which they contribute.

http://www.rochester.edu/in_visible_culture/


 

CHI 2012 Interactivity Explorations : Call for projects : artists, designers and makers

please consider submitting your projects and distribute where relevant.

CHI2012, the world's largest conference on human-computer-interaction, is opening its doors to artists, designers and makers whose focus is on cultural applications and explorations of future technologies, to acknowledge and support their influence on future technology thinking and development.

If your work asks questions and inspires reflection on the role of technology in people's lives, their dreams and imaginations, and if your mode of presentation can take us way beyond a traditional conference mindset, we want to hear from you. For the newly created Interactivity Explorations track we are looking for artworks, design experiences as well as inspirational technologies that the audience can engage with physically, intellectually and imaginatively.

CHI2012 will take place in Austin, Texas from May 5-10, 2012. Around 2000 people attend the conference every year. In addition to exhibiting curated and juried works, accepted explorations will have an extended abstract and video published through ACM, accessed by many more people long after the conference ends. CHI is a top-tier conference, so if you're connected to academia this will be of value.

Help us bring cutting edge cultural thinking into the traditional research sphere, and let your ways of working and thinking about technology impact all human-computer-interaction research.

The call for submissions is here: http://chi2012.acm.org/cfp-interactivity.shtml. If you have questions, please don't hesitate to contact us. Please be aware that there will be limited funding available to support shipment of exhibits only, and all exhibitors will need to register for the conference.

The submissions deadline is 9 January 2012 (5:00pm PDT)

http://chi2012.acm.org/cfp-interactivity.shtml


 

IJDL Call for Submissions

The International Journal of Designs for Learning is a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed online journal dedicated to publishing descriptions of artifacts, environments and experiences created to promote and support learning in all contexts by designers in any field. The aim of the journal is to support the production of high quality precedent materials and to promote and demonstrate the value of doing so. Audiences for the journal include designers, teachers and students of design and scholars studying the practice of design.

Full length design cases should include a detailed description of the intervention as the central focus. In addition, the case should address: the critical and/or interesting decisions made during the design process and their results in the intervention; key aspects of the design process as they are relevant to   the form of the intervention; transparent discussion of problems and/or failure analysis relevant to the intervention and its design. Authors should make clear the relationship of the author to the project being   described, context and conditions under which the project was carried out, and the features of the project that prompted the authors to make it the subject of a case. IJDL allows authors to present their cases using all the media capabilities the web affords -- audio, video and even animated interactions.

IJDL is sponsored jointly by Indiana University and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology.

Author guidelines at:

http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/ijdl/about/ submissions#authorGuidelines

View the latest issue of the IJDL at:

http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/ijdl/index


 

7-9 June 2012: FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DESIGN COMPUTING AND COGNITION DCC'12


Texas, USA

http://mason.gmu.edu/~jgero/conferences/dcc12/

CALL FOR PAPERS

This conference series aims to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of state-of-the-art and cutting edge research and developments in design computing and cognition.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: - Agents in design - Artificial intelligence in design - Biologically-inspired design - Collaborative design - Collective design - Cognitive neuroscience - Cognitive theories applied to design - Computational social science applied to design - Computational theories applied to design - Creative design - Digital media in design - Evolutionary approaches in design - Games and design - Human cognition in design - Learning from human designers - Machine learning in design - Multi-modal design - Situated computing in design - Virtual environments in design - Visual and spatial reasoning in design

Attendees are invited to participate in the conference in the following ways: - Submit a full-length paper on completed research relating to design computing and cognition; full papers due 6 January 2012 - Submit a poster describing ongoing research; there will be time for oral presentations of posters; poster abstracts due 3 February 2012 - Submit a proposal for a half-day workshop on a topic related to design computing and cognition; workshop proposals due 3 February 2012

Researchers from all fields employing computation and or cognition in design are invited to participate.

http://mason.gmu.edu/~jgero/conferences/dcc12/


 

18-20 September 2012:  International Conference on Design Creativity 2012, Glasgow.

The 2nd International Conference on Design Creativity (ICDC 2012) will take place in Glasgow, Scotland.

Design Creativity is an important and interesting topic of study in design. Since it involves the profound and essential nature of design, design creativity is expected to be a key in not only addressing the social problems that we are facing, but also producing an innate appreciation for beauty and happiness in our minds. In order to elucidate the nature of design creativity, the following issues are being studied: - Cognitive processes underlying design creativity - Computational models of design creativity - Practical processes to incorporate the human and social dimensions

After the success of the first ever International Conference on Design Creativity in 2010 in Kobe, Japan, the 2012 event will take place in Scotland in close cooperation with the University of Strathclyde.

Important dates: 09 March 2012: Full paper submission 04 May 2012: Paper acceptance notification

http://www.icdc2012.org.uk


 

10-12 July 2012: EVA London 2012
British Computer Society, Covent Garden, London WC2E 7HA www.eva-london.org

CALL FOR PROPOSALS Deadline: 22nd January 2012

Visualising ideas and concepts in culture, heritage the arts and sciences: digital arts, sound, music, film and animation, 2D and 3D imaging, European projects, archaeology, architecture, social media for museums, heritage and fine art photography, medical visualisation and more  OFFERS OF PAPERS, DEMONSTRATIONS AND WORKSHOPS by 22nd January 2012

A feature of EVA London is its varied session types. We invite proposals of papers, demonstrations, short performances, workshops or panel discussions. Demonstrations and performances will be an important part of this year's conference.  We especially invite papers or presentations on topical subjects, and the newest and cutting edge technologies and applications.

Only a summary of the proposal, on up to one page, is required for selection. This must be submitted electronically according to the instructions on the EVA London website. Proposals may be on any aspect of EVA London's focus on visualisation for arts and culture, heritage and medical science, broadly interpreted. Papers are peer reviewed and may be edited for publication as hard copy and online. Other presentations may be published as summaries or as papers.

 If your proposal is a case study, we will be looking for discussions of wider principles or applications using the case study as an example. A few bursaries for EVA London registration fees will again be available if you don't have access to grants.

EVA London's Conference themes will particularly include new and emerging technologies and applications, including but not limited to:

- Visualising ideas and concepts - Imaging and images in museums and galleries - Digital performance - Music, sound, film and animation - Medical humanities - Reconstructive archaeology and architecture - Digital and computational art and photography - Visualisation in museums, historic sites and buildings - Immersive environments - Technologies of digitisation - 2D, 3D and high definition imaging - Virtual and augmented worlds - Web 2.0 and 3.0 technologies in art and culture - Digital visualisation of performance and music


 

26-29 July 2012: Knowledge in a Box: How Mundane Things Shape Knowledge Production Kavala, Greece

Organizing committee: Susanne Bauer, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, Germany Maria Rentetzi, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece Martina Schluender, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany

The topic: We invite proposals from scholars in the history of science, technology, and medicine, science and technology studies, the humanities, visual and performing arts, museum and cultural studies and other related disciplines for a workshop on the uses and meanings of mundane things such as boxes, packages, bottles, and vials in shaping knowledge production. In keeping with the conference theme, we are asking contributors to include specific references to the ways in which boxes have played a role--commercial, epistemic or otherwise--in their own particular disciplinary frameworks.

Boxes have always supported the significance of the objects they contained, allowing specific activities to arise. In the hands of natural historians and collectors, boxes functioned as a means of organizing their knowledge throughout the eighteenth century. They formed the material bases of the cabinet or established collection and accompanied the collector from the initial gathering of natural specimens to their final display. As "knowledge chests" or "magazining tools" the history of box-like containers also go back to book printing and the typographical culture. The artists' boxes of the early nineteenth century were used to store the paraphernalia of a new fashionable trend. In the late nineteenth century the box became the pharmacist's laboratory and a device for standardizing and controlling dosage of oral remedies. In the twentieth century radiotherapy the box was elevated to a multifunctional tool working as a memory aid to forgetful patients or as "knowledge package" that predetermined dosages, included equipment, and ready-made radium applicators.

Focusing on medicine, boxes have played a crucial role since the eighteenth century when doctors ought to bring instruments to their patient's house for surgical or obstetrical interventions. In modern operating rooms boxes organize the workflow and build an essential part of the aseptical regime. Late twentieth century biomedical scientists store tissue samples in large-scale biobanks, where samples contained in straws are placed in vials, then the vials in boxes which in turn are stacked up in "elevators". This storage system facilitates retrieval with barcodes, indexing each individual sample so that additional variables can be retrieved from a database. Thus the container and its content are tied up in a close epistemic and material relationship.

As it is usually the case the box embodies the knowledge that goes into the chemical laboratory and its function; it classifies objects into collections of natural history; it meaningfully orders letters in a printer's composition or painting equipment for the artist' convenience; it standardizes pharmaceutical dosage forms and allows pharmacists to control the production and consumption of their remedies; in the commercial world it misleads or informs customers; it persuades consumers for the integrity of the product that they enclose; it hides the identity of the object(s) that contains, it shapes professional identities and is essential for mobilizing, transporting, accumulating and circulating materials and the knowledge they produce and embody.

Furthermore, if we do understand matter and materiality not as given, solid, continuous, and stable but rather as something being done, performed, shaped and embedded in practices, then we should examine closer how bottles and boxes themselves materialize differently in a set of diverse practices. How do they change their ontologies by migrating from the kitchen to the laboratory, from the workshop to the operating room?

We welcome innovative understandings of the role that boxes and containers have played historically and continue to play in technology, medicine, and science. We see the workshop as contributing to an ongoing interest in science and technology studies on the importance of mundane things in scientific practice and technological innovations.

Submission guidelines: Deadline for proposals: January 15, 2012 Please submit a 300-words abstract along with your name, institutional affiliation, email and phone number as a word or pdf attachment to the organizers of the conference

Proposals will be reviewed and notification of the outcome will be made in February 15, 2012. We are pursuing publication outlets for selected papers from the workshop. Therefore we expect full papers from those that will participate by May 30, 2012. Details will be provided after notification.

Conference registration fee: 50 euros

Place The venue of the conference is a wonderful tobacco warehouse renovated to host the tobacco museum of the city of Kavala in northern Greece.

Contact info For further information please contact the organizers:

Susanne Bauer sbauer@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de Maria Rentetzi mrentetz@vt.edu Martina Schluender m.schluender@gmx.de

Dr Matthew D Eddy Durham University, Department of Philosophy, 50/51 Old Elvet, Durham, DH1 3HN, United Kingdom. http://www.dur.ac.uk/m.d.eddy/ m.d.eddy@durham.ac.uk


 

5 May 2012: Call for participation: CHI 2012 Workshop on Visual Thinking and Digital Imagery

Format and Goals This workshop focuses on exploring the centrality of visual literacy and visual thinking to HCI. Drawing on emerging critical perspectives, the workshop will address visual literacy and visual thinking from an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary design-orientation, foregrounding the notion that imagery is a primary form of visual thinking. Imagery--which subsumes digital imagery--goes well beyond sketching and beyond storyboards, screenshots and wireframes. We will address how a broader framework for visual thinking and imagery in HCI can play a role in raising the visual standards of HCI research and practice. Workshop participants will investigate possibilities for developing a culture of curatorial gaze in HCI, in order to (i) promote collection of digital images as a method appropriate for a design-oriented discipline, (ii) invite others to contribute to a genre of working and corpus of imagery unique to HCI, and (iii) to expand the approaches that design-oriented HCI may productively and creatively draw upon.

Participant Selection Criteria & Requirements For Imagery and Optional Accompanying Position Papers

In keeping with the transdisciplinary foundation of visual thinking and design-oriented HCI, we hope to bring together a diverse group of HCI researchers and practitioners, as well as practitioners and academics in disciplines including (but not limited to) visual studies, design, photography, criticism, art, cultural studies, social sciences, and the humanities. First and foremost submissions will consist of visual thinking and/or digital imagery artifacts for curatorial review in advance of the workshop. A textual explanation or critical analysis of the artifact of no more than 4 pages in the CHI 2012 Extended Abstract format may be included. Submissions will be reviewed by the organizers, and 15-20 will be accepted. Accepted submissions will be placed on the workshop website, along with links to relevant literature.

Where to Submit Imagery and Papers Submit your Imagery and Optional Accompanying Position Paper by email visualthinkingCHIworkshop@gmail.com

Important Dates Jan 27 2012     Imagery and optional accompanying position paper due for review/selection Feb 10 2012     Notification to workshop participants by organizers Mar 16 2012     Advance registration ends

Note At least one author of each accepted position paper must attend the workshop and all participants must register for the workshop and for at least one day of the conference.

Organizers Eli Blevis School of Informatics and Computing Indiana University at Bloomington eblevis@indiana.edu Elizabeth F. Churchill Internet Experiences Group, Yahoo! Research, churchill@acm.org William Odom HCI Institute Carnegie Melon University wodom@cs.cmu.edu James Pierce HCI Institute Carnegie Mellon University jjpierce@cs.cmu.edu David Roedl School of Informatics and Computing Indiana University at Bloomington droedl@indiana.edu Ron Wakkary School of Interactive Arts & Technology Simon Fraser University rwakkary@sfu.ca


 

IDEA JOURNAL 2012

Writing /drawing: negotiating the perils and pleasures of interiority Guest Editor: Dr Sarah Treadwell

The forthcoming issue of the IDEA JOURNAL calls for contributions in the form scholarly essays, visual essays and theorized creative practice on the topic of Writing /Drawing: negotiating the perils and pleasures of interiority.

Provocation Interiority is subject to specific sorts of disciplinary representation and the premise for this provocation is that images of interiority are frequently at odds with, or resistant to conventional representational systems. Interiority is attached to socially and culturally selected manifestations of power, gender, labour and materiality and these everyday conditions emerge in images of interiority, drawn or written, amplifying and disquieting usual disciplinary concerns.

Three sketched examples: One In an architectural journal is a description of a house in Bordeaux by Rem Koolhaas, as recounted by Susana Ventura on a visit to the house where she follows Guadalupe who is the housekeeper: *I follow Guadalupe back and forth. She zigzags up the ramp of the patio. She says this is the best way not to be tired at the end.  * Off goes Guadalupe with the vacuum cleaner in hand, vacuuming everything she encounters. First, the kitchen. She displaces the movable furniture below the kitchen bench, vacuums the drawers, the countless bottles, the ceiling, the door * She shakes the carpet on the patio, puts it back in place. Then on to the top floor, where she vacuums Marie*s bathroom and bedroom, the elevator platform, every single corner she can find.* (Susana Ventura, *Being Stuck: Between reality and Fiction*, Log 16, Spring/Summer 2009, 145)

The architectural interior is revealed through a reporting of movement and a slow material engagement with surface, writing into the interior an everyday attentiveness and neglect, constructing interiority as both abject, with the stuffy persistence of unwanted patina (shedding skin and the adherence of soot), and as a form of worship, gilded with polish. The interior is constructed through writing in terms of its occupation and maintenance with language that is both personal and detached.

Two A black and white line drawing of an interior set up by a vertical section perspective of House and Atelier Bow-Wow by Atelier Bow-Wow, described by Irene Cheng as a parody of a technical drawing incorporating *many elements normally excluded from construction documents, such as perspectival depth; silhouettes of human figures engaged in prosaic activities like eating, brushing teeth, gardening, and sleeping; props like slippers, stuffed animals; house plants, and shag rugs; outlines of the views seen through windows; and the obsessive rendering of textures like those of wood surfaces.* (Irene Cheng House of Mirth: Atelier Bow-Wow*s Ironies* in Harvard Design Magazine 29 Fall/Winter 2008-9, 62.)

A drawing that shifts the nature of the technical interior, the dimensioned, constructed and abstract set of building information, into an inhabited, furnished narrative of daily life. The daily life is however artificial; the people are ghosts and the stories told by the furnishings are improbably clean; there is no colour.

Three A black and white photograph taken in the early years of the twentieth century by Alfred James Tattersall shows the interior of a Samoan fale with two women lying supposedly asleep on mats in the middle of the empty space. Titled, *Interior of Native House*, the image might be seen as the ubiquitous collector*s assemblage with wooden headrests in view and the women contained by the borders of their mats. The photographic focus, however, is sharpest as it traces the framing and woven materiality of the fale, recording the precision of the bindings that connect structure, while the gentle breath of the women, in the long exposure, very slightly blurs the image and resists their capture.

(Tattersall, Alfred James (1866-1951), *House interior with women on sleeping mats*, Date unknown [c 1925] Samoa b&w original negative, ID: 1/2-094329-F Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington.)

This provocation seeks papers that address the complications and felicities of representing all forms of interiority (domestic, work spaces, institutional or public spaces) from technical, theoretical, programmatic or cultural perspectives. It seeks to attract discussions on representations of the interior constructed with writing, drawing (analogue or digital), installation, performance, photography, film or building.

THE IDEA JOURNAL ACCEPTS:

DESIGN RESEARCH PAPERS that demonstrate development and engagement with interior design/interior architecture history, theory, education and practice through critique and synthesis. The focus is on the documentation and critical review of both speculative research and practice-based research

REFEREED STUDIOS that represent the nature and outcomes of refereed design studios which have either been previously peer reviewed in situ and/or critically discussed through text and imagery for the IDEA JOURNAL.

PROJECT REVIEWS that critically evaluate design-based works which seek to expand the nature of spatial and theoretical practice in interior design/interior architecture and associated disciplines.

VISUAL ESSAYS that demonstrate critical, pictorial responses to design conditions.

FOR BOOK REVIEWS to encourage debate into the emerging literature dedicated to the expression and expansion of the theory and practice of interior design/interior architecture.

REGISTRATION OF INTEREST: Authors are invited to register their interest in submitting a paper on the form attached and forward by email to the Executive Editor, Rachel Carley by 10 February 2012. (If there is no attachment then visit http://www.idea-edu.com/Journal/2012/2012-IDEA-Journal where a call for papers/registration form can be downloaded).

Registration of interest is not refereed. The acknowledgement of registration facilitates development of proposal to full research paper, refereed studio or project review by providing formatting guidelines and publication standards to registrants.

Email: rcarley@unitec.ac.nz

IMPORTANT DEADLINES/DATES: Call for contributions: 1 December 2011 Registration of interest including 50 word abstract and image if appropriate due by 10 February 2012 Acknowledgement by 19 February 2012 Submit full draft for review by 16 July 2012 Peer-review - August-September 2012 Notification by 5 November 2012 Revisions returned by 30 November 2012 Journal published early 2013 with 2012 date

GUEST EDITOR: The guest editor for the 2012 IDEA Journal is Dr Sarah Treadwell. Sarah is an Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of Auckland. Her research investigates the representation of architecture in colonial and contemporary images. Motels, gender and volcanic conditions of ground are also subjects of interest. Sarah has published in various books and journals including Architectural Design, Space and Culture and Architectural Theory Review.

The IDEA JOURNAL is published by IDEA (Interior Design / Interior Architecture Educators Association) ACN 135 337 236

http://www.idea-edu.com


 

Call for Papers: Digital Creativity Special Issue on Design Fictions

Digital Creativity is a major peer-reviewed journal at the intersection of the creative arts and digital technologies. It publishes articles of interest to those involved in the practical task and theoretical aspects of making or using digital media in creative contexts. By the term 'creative arts' we include such disciplines as fine art, graphic design, illustration, photography, printmaking, sculpture, 3D design, interaction design, product design, textile and fashion design, film making, animation, games design, music, dance, drama, creative writing, poetry, interior design, architecture, and urban design.

This special issue of the journal invites papers, projects and reviews exploring and developing the notion of Design Fictions. One of the early proponents of Design Fictions, the author Bruce Sterling, said that design: "seeks out ways to jump over its own conceptual walls - scenarios, user observation, brainstorming, rapid prototyping, critical design, speculative design" (Sterling, 2009). Despite the current burgeoning of this field and its various histories and antecedents, the coming together of design and fiction, as 'design fictions', remains relatively underexplored.

Design Fictions might also be sensed as a 'speculative turn' in design practice, founding a new engagement in 'prototyping' conjectural projections of designed futures. In the context of ever-present near futures, projected as scenarios that threaten radical ruptures of the real, digital creativity expands into a post-digital cybernetics. Design Fictions speculative design methodologies take their cue from science fiction, Sterling however would also have it the other way around, saying that: "design and literature don't talk together much, but design has more to offer literature at the moment than literature can offer design" (Sterling, 2009).

This issue seeks to put design and literature into conversation. The journal wishes to ask how Design Fictions and related methodological work have mutated or glitched across art, design and architecture, for example in response to 'design fictions' (Nokia/Bleecker); in 'critical design' (Dunne & Raby); in speculative and visionary architecture (Spiller); in science fiction as prototyping (Intel/Johnson); and in ethnographic work on design and prototyping (Kelty). Papers are invited from three broad areas:

- Papers offering critical reflections on post-digital futures rendered as Design Fictions. - Papers that illustrate what contemporary design provides as an alternative to the structural orthodoxies of mappings of the 'hard' science fictional to the 'engineering of creativity' (Altshuller). - Papers that reflect on Design Fictions as a methodology and on the ways in which fictional constructs and diegetic prototypes might open design discourse on cybernetic futures.

Initial proposals should be extended abstracts in English, between 800-1200 words. The categories for final submission are Short Papers between 2500-3500 words, and Long Papers, between 5000-7000 words. The papers will be selected through a blind peer review process. Upon acceptance of the abstract, you will be sent further authors' guidelines based on the Digital Creativity guidelines (Instructions for Authors) at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/NDCR.

The extended abstract should include the following information: 1) Name of author(s) with email addresses and affiliation, if applicable 2) Title of the paper 3) Body of the abstract 4) Preliminary bibliography 5) Author(s)'s short bio(s) 6) Indication of whether the submission will be a short or a long paper.

Important dates: Initial proposals (extended abstracts) deadline: March 5, 2012 Notification of extended abstract acceptance (by editors' review): March 26, 2012 Final papers are due on: June 04, 2012 Blind peer-reviews due on: July 30, 2012 Revised final papers are due on: September 3, 2012 Special issue published: Winter 2012

Recipients: Please forward your abstract as a PDF attachment in an e-mail addressed to the special issue and Digital Creativity editors below:

Derek Hales, special issue guest editor <hales.derek@gmail.com<mailto:hales.derek@gmail.com>> Digital Creativity editors <dcsubmit@gmail.com<mailto:dcsubmit@gmail.com>>


 

5-9 August 2012: SIGGRAPH 2012 (The 39th International Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques), Los Angeles Convention Centre

CALL FOR PAPERS

ART PAPERS SIGGRAPH 2012, in collaboration with Leonardo/ISAST, honors not only artists and artwork, but also the process of making art and its place in society. Art Papers illuminate and explore the changing roles of artists and the methods of art-making in our increasingly networked and computationally mediated world. They inform artistic disciplines, set standards, and stimulate future trends. In addition to the core topics of digital arts and interactive techniques, Art Papers can explore the theme of the SIGGRAPH 2012 juried Art Gallery: In Search of the Miraculous, or any other topic consistent with the hybrid culture of SIGGRAPH.

What is an Art Paper? An Art Paper presents a compelling art or design practice within a solid conceptual framework and in accessible ways. In addition to providing a well-articulated description of the work in consideration, the Art Paper must introduce its historical and theoretical context, provide a conceptual narrative that inspires and provokes, and if applicable, argue for its technological innovations. A SIGGRAPH 2012 Art Paper can take the form of one of these five categories: Project Description, Position Paper, Thematic Survey, Technical Paper, or Monograph (only if the author is no longer active).

Authors present Art Papers in 20-minute sessions with five minutes of Q&A. The papers will be published in a special issue of Leonardo, The Journal of the International Society of the Arts, Sciences and Technology. The issue also includes visual documentation of the works exhibited in the Art Gallery. Publication of this fourth special issue coincides with SIGGRAPH 2012.

Submissions are due by 22:00 UTC/GMT, 10 January 2012.

http://s2012.siggraph.org/submitters/art-papers


 

11-14 September 2012: 8th International Conference on Design and Emotion LONDON 2012 - OUT OF CONTROL Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design

CALL FOR PAPERS

Dear Colleagues, The organising committee of the 8th International Design & Emotion Conference, London, 11th-14th September 2012, is very pleased to invite you to participate in this conference. This conference is a forum held every other year where practitioners, academics and industry leaders meet and exchange knowledge and insights concerning the cross-disciplinary field of design and emotion. We are looking for researchers, academics and practitioners to submit proposals for the following:

1) Paper Submissions Full Papers are expected to contribute widely applicable long-lasting knowledge to the discipline. Accepted papers will be presented in the conference programme and published in the proceedings. The paper length is a maximum of 12 pages (approximately 4,000-5,000 words plus figures and tables) in the specified format, which will be detailed on the website (including a template). Short Papers (Posters) are expected to describe research that is more appropriate for the interactive poster session. The paper length should be a maximum of 5 pages (approximately 2,000 words plus figures and tables) and an additional page containing a full-page image of the poster in the specified format for the publication in the conference proceedings. The first submission requires a short paper manuscript without the poster page.

2) Case Studies Case studies are invited for submission to present design projects that address issues and insights in design and emotion, or to communicate and discuss your approach to enhance emotional effects. These must include a summary description in a maximum of 5 pages (approximately 2,000 words) in the specified format and a maximum of 30 slides illustrating the design, design process and use.

3) Workshops & Masterclasses Workshops & Masterclasses of either a full or half-day will be held on 11th September 2012 prior to the main programme of the conference. The purpose is to provide a platform for presenting and discussing novel ideas and emerging issues in a less formal way than the conference itself. The format of each workshop/masterclass is to be determined by its organiser, but each one is expected to include ample time for general discussion.

THEMES AND TOPICS While Design & Emotion is the overarching focus of the conference--allowing us to consider all aspects of the relationship between human experience and design understood in its widest senses--the theme this year is "Out of Control".

For a number of years, uncertainty, crisis and chaos have been keywords describing the experience of many of us. A world driven by uncertainty, crisis and chaos demands different responses from design (as a community, a practice and a process). On one hand we can mitigate against these--designing systems which can withstand, or manage, the challenges they produce. Here there is a focus upon design as a "problem-solving" activity. On the other, we can use them as springboards to a creative future. In this way, design as "opportunity mapping" becomes important. We would like to encompass both of these approaches to design and to examine how they impact upon, or are generated by, the whole spectrum of human emotion experienced at the macro (socio-cultural), micro (personal), meta (philosophical), processural (methodological) and strategic levels. This conference is open to any theoretical, empirical or methodological work on Design & Emotion and we are particularly interested in receiving papers from researchers, academics and practitioners in the following topic areas (though they are by no means exhaustive and other work relevant to the theme will be considered):

Society/Culture: Socially Responsive/Responsible Design Design for Behavioural Change Design & Space/Environment Design for Digital Media Corporate Social Responsibility

The Self/The Object: Design & Identity Design & Well-Being (inc. food, healthcare & love) Design & Illusion, Fake & Fraud User Experience (inc. Human Factors & HCI) Experience Design

The Philosophical: Design without Emotion Design, Affect & the Materiality of Experience Design, Magic & Enchantment

Processes, Methodologies, Tools & Methods: Research Methodologies Theoretical Foundations Empirical Approaches

Design, Strategy & Innovation: Design & the Future (foresight/trends) Designing Services Business Experience Branding

SUBMISSION AND REVIEW PROCESS Submission and review processes will be handled by our conference system. All submissions will go through a blind-review process with at least two reviewers considering each proposal. All submissions accepted in the second review will be asked to submit the final manuscripts in the camera-ready format. The detailed authoring guideline will be available on the conference website.

IMPORTANT DATES 1st February 2012:  Papers & Case Study submissions 15th April 2012:   Notification of Acceptance Papers & Case Studies 1st May 2012:  Workshops/Masterclasses submissions 15th May 2012:  Notification of Acceptance Workshops/Masterclasses 1st June 2012:  Final Paper submissions 15th June 2012:  Final Acceptance 15th July 2012:  Early Registration 11th September 2012:  Workshops/Masterclasses 12th-14th September 2012:  Conference http://www.csm.arts.ac.uk/de2012/


 

CRAFT RESEARCH CALL for SUBMISSIONS for the FOURTH ISSUE of CRAFT RESEARCH

Editors

Dr Kristina Niedderer, University of Wolverhampton, UK email: k.niedderer@wlv.ac.uk Dr Katherine Townsend, Nottingham Trent University email: katherine.townsend@ntu.ac.uk

Submission

The final date for submission of contributions for the fourth issue is Friday 1 June 2012.

For guidance notes or further information, or to submit an article or review, please contact the editors or visit the journal's website for details:

http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=172/

Aims & Scope

Craft Research is the first peer-reviewed academic journal dedicated to the development and advance of contemporary craft practice and theory through research. The aim of Craft Research is to portray and build the crafts as a vital and viable modern discipline that offers a vision for the future and for the sustainable development of human social, economical and ecological issues. This role of craft is rooted in its flexible nature as a conduit from design at one end to art at the other. It gains its strength from its at times experimental, at times developmental nature, which enables craft to explore and challenge technology, to question and develop cultural and social practices, and to interrogate philosophical and human values.

Call for Papers

Craft Research aims to actively promote and strengthen this future-oriented role of the crafts. In order to do so, it recognises inter and cross disciplinary practices, and encourages diverse approaches to research arising from practice, theory and philosophy. It welcomes contributions from new and established researchers, scholars, and professionals around the world who wish to make a contribution to advancing the crafts. Contributions may include research into materials, technology, processes, methods, concepts, aesthetics and philosophy, etc. in any discipline area of the applied arts and crafts, including craft education. Craft Research welcomes a number of different types of contributions as set out below.

Contributions

Full Research Papers (4000-6000 words) - They will describe completed research projects, including research problem, questions, methods, outcomes, and findings. They should include original work of a research and/or developmental nature and/or propose new methods or ideas that are clearly and thoroughly presented and argued.

Short Research Papers / Position Papers (2000-3000 words) -   Short Research Papers may describe smaller research projects or research in progress including research problem, questions, methods, (expected) outcomes and findings. They are an opportunity to new researchers/practitioners to get into publishing. -   Position papers may put forward and debate a position on a particular (current) issue (e.g. new technology, material, theoretical, social or educational issue). Both should include original work of a research or developmental nature and/or propose new methods or ideas that are clearly and thoroughly presented and argued.

Both should include original work of a research and/or developmental nature and/or propose new methods or ideas that are clearly and thoroughly presented and argued. They are an opportunity for new researchers/practitioners to have their research/work published.

Craft & Industry Reports (1500-3000 words) Reports of Investigative Practice from Craft & Industry should present an advance in and for the field, including collaborations and new developments of work, processes, methods, ideas etc. by practitioners and industry in the crafts.

Review Section. We invite reviews of the following: -   The Portrait Section (1000-2000 words) Will feature the work of an individual (crafts person, artist, designer, maker, researcher) within the field whose creative work stands out for its developmental / research qualities and contribution to the crafts. -   The Exhibition Section (1000-2000 words) Will feature scholarly reviews of exhibitions that are of particular developmental / research significance for the field for the technical, conceptual, aesthetic, social etc. quality of the work or for the curation. -   The Publication Review (1000-2000 words) Will feature reviews of publications in print and new media. -   The Conference Section (1000-2000 words) Will feature reviews of any relevant conferences/symposia/etc. in the field.

Calendar of Exhibitions & Conferences We invite notifications of important and relevant forthcoming craft exhibitions and craft conferences/research events.

Remarkable Image Section We invite the submission of images of outstanding quality for their novelty, beauty, complexity, simplicity, challenging nature, humour, humanity, etc. that are representative of contemporary crafts developments and research.


 
________________________________________________________________


 

ANNOUNCEMENTS


 

8-10 February 2012: ServDes conference, Espoo, Finland

The ServDes conference is the premier research conference within service design and service innovation. The conference joins the great minds of academics and business professionals from both private and public sectors to share and co-create knowledge on selected topics. The first ServDes.2009 Conference investigated the legacy from other design disciplines. The second ServDes.2010 Conference focused on ExChanging Knowledge. This is the third conference.

The ServDes.2012 conference focuses on Co-creating Services. The conference will include both presentations of research papers and business cases.

http://www.servdes.org/


 

Carnegie Mellon School of Design announces three full-time tenure track positions, at the assistant, associate or full professor rank for fall, 2012.

For more information, and to apply, go to

design.cmu.edu/facultysearch/


 

STARTING-OUT Discussion list for new and early career lecturers

The 'Starting Out' list is a discussion list for new and early career lecturers in dance, drama and music and other performing and creative arts disciplines. The aim of the list is to proivide a forum for the discussion and dissemination of ideas, issues, concerns and questions, etc., related to supporting new and early career lecturers and enhancing learning and teaching.

http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/starting-out


 

DEED Discussion list for the Design Education Association

DEED represents Departments, Schools, Faculties and Courses offering advanced level design education, including post-graduate studies and research in a variety of design areas.

DEED recognises the increasing significance of interdisciplinary practice in all areas of design with the advent of the new information technologies, multimedia and computer-based design. In tandem with the increasingly multidisciplinary nature of design education with the growth of modularity, hybrid design disciplines and research.

DEED supports its members and the broader academic community through a variety of activities including annual conferences, seminars, workshops, papers, and representation to the media, Government and other interested organisations.

http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/deed


 

VISUAL-METHODS-NEWS Visual Methods News

News and announcements associated with the International Visual Methods conferences (see http://www.visualmethods.org)

http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/visual-methods-news


 

18-19 April 2012: the 9th Design Thinking Research Symposium [DTRS 2012], entitled "Articulating Design Thinking" that will be held at the School of Design, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

The 2 day symposium will present the latest research in design thinking and includes researchers from several countries across the world including Australia, Denmark, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Turkey, the UK, and the USA. The conference proceedings will be published as a book titled "Articulating Design Thinking" by Libri Publishers, Oxon.

Details of the DTRS 2012 Conference Registration process and the Programme are now available via the following link:

http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/academic/scd/whatson/news/dtrs


 

23 January 2012: OUTSIDE: activating cloth to enhance the way we live

An international conference and forum for practising artists, craftspeople, activists, curators, students and volunteers who are excited by the potential of cloth to enhance the way we live.

School of Art, Design and Architecture University of Huddersfield Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH UK

Keynote speakers confirmed: Jennifer Marsh Prof Lesley Millar Betsy Greer June Hill

Jennifer Marsh, founder and director of the community and public art organization, International Fiber Collaborative (IFC) based in the United States, offers the benefits of dynamic cross-curricular art education, international collaboration, and an outlet for individual expression.

Professor Lesley Millar is Professor of Textile Culture at University for the Creative Arts and curator of a number of significant international textile exhibitions, including 'Lost in Lace', 'Textural Space', 'Through the Surface' and 'Cloth & Culture Now'.

Betsy Greer is a maker, writer and researcher currently living just outside Washington DC. Blending social science, the handmade and past histories, she works with craft's relationship with activism, or craftivism.

June Hill is a freelance curator and writer. She contributes regularly to magazines and exhibition catalogues, is the author of several artist monographs and is featured in The Textile Reader (Berg 2012)

For more information please visit the web page at:

http://www.hud.ac.uk/cricp/events/headline,24084,en.php


 

INTERACTING WITH COMPUTERS

The latest issue of the journal is available online: Interacting with Computers Volume 23, Issue 5, Pages 385-564, September 2011

Special Issue: Feminism and HCI: New Perspectives (ed. Shaowen Bardzell & Elizabeth Churchill)

Feminism and HCI: New Perspectives Shaowen Bardzell & Elizabeth Churchill

Phoebe Sengers, Steve Harrison & Deborah Tatar Making Epistemological Trouble: Third-Paradigm HCI as Successor Science

Jennifer Rode A Theoretical Agenda for Feminist HCI

Sheryl Brahnam, Marianthe Karanikas, Margaret Weaver (Un)dressing the Interface: Exposing the Foundational HCI Metaphor 'Computer Is Woman'

Jill Dimond, Casey Fiesler & Amy Bruckman Domestic Violence and Information and Communication Technologies

Nancy Van House Feminist HCI Meets Facebook: Performativity and Social Networking Sites

Ann Light HCI as Heterodoxy: technologies of identity and the queering of interaction with computers

Nalini Kotamraju Playing Stupid, Caring for Users, and Putting on a Good Show: Feminist Acts in Usability Work

Michael Muller Feminism asks the "Who" Questions in HCI

Regular Papers

Scott D. Fleming, Margaret M Burnett, Laura Beckwith, Susan Wiedenbeck, Jill Cao, Thomas H Park, Valentina Grigoreanu & Kyle Rector Gender Pluralism in Problem-Solving Software

Sarah Diefenbach & Marc Hassenzahl The Dilemma of the Hedonic - appreciated, but hard to justify

Sari Kujala, Virpi Roto, Kaisa Vaeaenaenen-Vainio-Mattila, Evangelos Karapanos & Arto Sinnelae UX Curve: A Method for Evaluating Long-Term User Experience

Luigi De Russis DOGeye: Controlling your Home with Eye Interaction

Sara Price & Taciana Pontual Falcao Where the attention is: Discovery learning in tangible environments

Joel Lanir, Tsvi Kuflik, Alan J. Wecker, Massimo Zancanaro & Oliviero Stock Examining proactiveness and choice in a location-aware mobile museum guide

Yeliz Yesilada, Giorgio Brajnik & Simon Harper Barriers Common to Mobile and Disabled Web Users

Sergio Sayago Everyday use of computer-based communication tools and evolution of interaction barriers: an ethnographical study with older people

Ethan V. Munson & James Dabrowski 40 Years of Searching for the Best Computer System Response Time

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/issue/271616-1-s2.0- S0953543811X00061


 

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI) Special Issue on "Sustainable HCI through Everyday Practices"


Special issue editors: James Pierce (Carnegie Mellon University), Phoebe Sengers (Cornell University),Yolande Strengers (Centre for Design, RMIT University), Susanne Bodker (University of Aarhus)

Deadline for Abstract Submissions: February 1, 2012 Deadline for Full Submissions: April 15, 2012 Reviews Due: May 30, 2012 Author Notification: June 15, 2012 Revised Papers Due: August 15, 2012 Special Issue Published: First or Second Quarter 2013

http://tochi.acm.org/si/sustainable.shtml

To date, sustainable HCI research has focused largely on changing individuals' behavior in order to address large-scale environmental concerns such as climate change, drawing predominantly on theories and concepts from psychology and behavioral economics. In this special issue, we explore new research opportunities derived from redirecting emphasis from individual behavior to everyday social and cultural practices. An everyday practice-oriented approach is used in fields including anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, philosophy and geography, and emphasizes the complex, cultural, material, and social contexts in which resource-consuming and environmentally-damaging activities are situated. A critical difference between many of the understandings of human action drawn on in sustainable HCI and a practice perspective is an analytical focus on the organization and reorganization of shared activities and routines, rather than individuals' behavior or broad-scale social norms. In other words, practices, rather than people, become the unit of enquiry and focus of analysis and critique.

This special issue will bring together works that use empirical case studies of everyday practices and/or develop theoretical perspectives on everyday practice to critically and creatively re-think how HCI researches and designs for environmental sustainability. Everyday practices are not only a potential locus of intervention for sustainable HCI; they equally raise issues about and provide opportunities for how HCI can and should approach sustainability. For example,

- Empirical and theoretical accounts of everyday practice challenge psychologically- and economically-informed accounts of how social and behavioral change happens (e.g., Akrich, 1992; Schatzki, 1997; Shove, 2003).

- Grounded studies of common everyday practices such as cooking, laundering and leisure activities raise questions about the appropriateness of "rational choice" approaches that target the conscious motivations and behaviors of individual consumers (e.g., Shove 2003; Pierce et al., 2010; Strengers, 2011).

- Engagement with diverse communities--such as the homeless (Woelfer and Hendry, 2010), subsistence fishing communities (Brynjarsdottir and Sengers, 2010), low-income communities (Dillahunt et al., 2009), and ecovillages and "bright greens" (Nathan, 2008; Woodruff et al., 2008) and wealthy, highly mobile individuals (Peterson, Lynggaard & Krogh, 2010)--raise issues of what exactly is considered sustainable or unsustainable, and who gets to decide.

- Consideration of the various ways HCI aims to intervene in everyday consumption practices raises ethical issues about these approaches: are they empowering, persuading, or coercing? What are the ethical implications of considering "everyday practice"--as routinized ways of behaving and living--as a unit of intervention for HCI and design more broadly?

- Reflection on the areas of everyday practice that HCI does and does not target and the types of technologies that are studied and employed (e.g., interactive products, automated systems, services, infrastructures) raise issues of where HCI can, should and should not aim to effect change for sustainability.

This special issue will bring together empirical and theoretical contributions regarding everyday practices to critically and creatively re-think how HCI researches and designs for sustainability. An overall goal of this issue is to bring together a collection of works that will cross-inform the areas of interpretive social science, critical reflection and design in the context of sustainable HCI. Contributions from multiple perspectives are welcome and may, for example, do one or more of the following:

- Examine everyday sustainable practices that inspire ideas for IT design - Explicate practices of non-mainstream communities such as dumpster divers, vintage car buffs, or urban farmers for concepts or orientations that sustainable HCI might usefully build on - Empirically analyze unsustainable practices to understand how they come about and what they tell us about processes of practice change and the role of design and IT in those processes. - Analyze the varied conceptions of sustainability that are enacted in everyday practice and how they might usefully inform the ways sustainable HCI frames its research approaches - Use reflection on specific everyday practices to rethink sustainable HCI research and professional practice - Offer new theoretical contributions and insights that assist HCI designers in broadening current understandings of human action towards a practice-oriented perspective

Contributions may also:

- Reflect on and/or argue for individual behavior change approaches in relation to everyday practice approaches, for example, through discussions of the role of "behaviors" vs. "practices" with respect to case studies of "persuasive" or eco-feedback technologies, or discussions of epistemological differences in theoretical approaches. Contributions that adopt a behavioral perspective should be clearly identified as such, and discuss how their position relates to practice-based perspectives.

Deadline: 300-500-word abstracts are required for submission to the special issue, and are due February 1, 2012. Full manuscripts are due April 15, 2012, but early submissions are encouraged.

Please submit abstracts to everydaypracticeTOCHI@gmail.com

Additional info can be found at:

http://www.jamesjpierce.com/TOCHI-special-issue/everyday-practice -through-sustainable-HCI.html

http://tochi.acm.org/si/sustainable.shtml


 

Design and Culture The Journal of the Design Studies Forum Volume 03, Issue 03 | November 2011

ARTICLES

Rethinking Design Thinking: Part I | LUCY KIMBELL [FULL ARTICLE] http://www.designstudiesforum.org/journal-articles/rethinking- design-thinking-part-i-2/

Digitizing North: A Critical Discussion of Jonathan Harris' The Whale Hunt | JACQUELINE WALLACE [ABSTRACT] http://www.designstudiesforum.org/journal-articles/digitizing- north-a-critical-discussion-of-jonathan-harriss-the-whale-hunt/

Click/Scan/Bold: The Materiality of Architecture and Its Media  | SHANNON MATTERN [ABSTRACT] http://www.designstudiesforum.org/journal-articles/clickscanbold- the-new-materiality-of-architectural-discourse-and-its-counter- publics/

On Wearing: A Critical Framework for Valuing Design's Already Made |  ABBY MELLICK LOPES, ALISON GILL [ABSTRACT] http://www.designstudiesforum.org/journal-articles/on-wearing-a- critical-framework-for-valuing-designs-already-made/

LOCATING DESIGN

A Site Every Design Professional Should See: The Marika-Alderton House, Yirrkala | NANETTE CARTER

Oxford University Press Museum and Archive, Walton Street, Oxford, UK | DAVID RAIZMAN

"The Seal's Lair," As Seen Via Google Earth | ANNE SOBIECH MUNSON

EXHIBITION REVIEWS

Counter Space  |  IBEN FALCONER Natalie Jeremijenko  |  BRYANA DEVINE Design Research Unit  |  HARRIET ATKINSON Hyperlinks  |  JONATHAN MEKINDA Las Vegas Studio | MICHAEL GOLEC Super Normal  | FREDIE FLORE

BOOK REVIEWS

Enfoldment and Infinity | JR OSBORN MUJI | DANIEL HUPPATZ FashionEast | ANNA BRZYSKI Prime Movers of Globalization | CARMA GORMAN Signs of the Times: The Visual Politics of Jim Crow | ELIZABETH GUFFEY

http://www.designstudiesforum.org/journal/issues/november-2011/


 

Guide for Assisted Living

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Building Research Establishment (BRE) launched the Guide for Assisted Living for architects and other built environment professionals involved in the design and adaptation of residences that meet the needs of elderly and the chronically ill people, to enable them to live active, independent and dignified lives. The guide demonstrates how intuitive design and assistive technology can improve the quality of life, wellbeing and autonomy of individuals, and be delivered in effective, scalable and affordable ways.

http://www.architecture.com/NewsAndPress/News/RIBANews/News/2011/ AhomeforlifeDesigninglivingspacesfortheelderlyandvulnerable.aspx


 

20-22 April 2012: 2012 SYMPOSIUM at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA


This symposium is the first of a series of events entitled "Fashion And ... " connecting fashion with other themes of importance in today's world. The symposia of Fashion And... will examine the implications of fashion in today's world.

Fashion is change and because it is change, fashion impacts nearly every aspect of our lives from the language we speak, the furniture we use, the homes we live in, the cars we drive, the clothes we wear, and the food we eat. For our inaugural event we focus on relationships between fashion and health. Fashion and health are symbiotic; each affects the other. Fashion can make us stand straighter and help prevent osteoporosis. Fashion can also damage our feet and our balance through a choice of shoes or it can exercise our leg muscles and improve our gait. Fashion can protect us from the harsh rays of the sun or monitor our health through embedded electronic sensors. Fashion is a visualization of how we choose to live our lives. The fashion choices we make affect our thoughts and feelings (emotionally, spiritually, physically). And if looks could kill, we'd all dress better.

This symposium connects fashion to the topic of health. Through a series of scholarly presentations, panel discussions, design presentations, the symposium participants will explore, define, and document the interconnections between fashion and health.

The symposium has an inclusive definition of the term "fashion". While fashion is often understood to center on apparel choices, fashion can be recognized as the current style or aesthetic choice in any design field. Proposals are welcome from divergent fields such as architecture, anthropology, cultural studies, history, interior design, graphic design, psychology, sociology, and women's studies.

This symposium will provide the opportunity for researchers and both graduate and undergraduate students to exchange research findings, innovative teaching strategies, and creative designs addressing the interrelationships of fashion and health.

Symposium Co-Chairs: Kim K. P. Johnson Brad Hokanson

http://design.umn.edu/fashionand/health/index.html


 

Journal of Research Practice (JRP) Volume 7, Issue 1, 2011

Special Issue: On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research Practice

Editorial On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research Maarit Maekelae, Nithikul Nimkulrat, D. P. Dash, Francois-X. Nsenga

Main Article A Nomos for Art and Design Tom McGuirk

Provocative Idea A Discrete Continuity: On the Relation Between Research and Art Practice Tim O'Riley

Art Portraying Medicine Kaisu Koski

Critical Practical Analogy: A Research Tool for Reflecting and Making Dino Alfier

http://jrp.icaap.org/index.php/jrp/issue/view/15.


 

DIGITAL CREATIVITY

Special issue on mobile ubiquitous computing, Mobile Ubiquity in Public and Private Spaces, Diaz L. and Ekman U. (eds.), Digital Creativity, Volume 22, No. 3, Taylor Francis, has just been published.

Table of Contents:

1. Introduction to Mobile ubiquity in public and private spaces Lily Diaz & Ulrik Ekman pages 127-133
2. Towards a theory of pervasive ludology: reflections on gameplay, rules, and space Bo Kampmann Walther pages 134-147
3. Ubiquitous apps: politics of openness in global mobile cultures Gerard Goggin pages 148-159
4. Urban fictions: a critical reflection on locative art and performative geographies Petra Gemeinboeck & Rob Saunders pages 160-173
5. Mobile innovation: designing and evaluating situated simulations Gunnar Liestol, Terje Rasmussen & Tomas Stenarson pages 174-186
6. Good grief: the role of social mobile media in the 3.11 earthquake disaster in Japan Larissa Hjorth & Kyoung-Hwa Yonnie Kim pages 187-199
7. Provoking the city--touch installations for urban space Heidi Tikka, Sandra Vina, Giulio Jacucci & Teemu Korpilahti pages 200-214

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ndcr20/current


 

Announcing the first of two issues of Design Philosophy Papers on the theme of 'Beyond Progressive Design'. Part 2 to be published late February/early March.


DESIGN PHILOSOPHY PAPERS 3/2011

Sean Donahue, Rama Gheerawo, Anne-Marie Willis, Editorial: Beyond Progressive Design

Shana Agid, ''How do we design something transition people from a system that doesn't want to let them go?" Social design and its political contexts'

Matt Kiem, 'Designing the social, and the politics of social innovation'

Kenton Card, 'Democratic social architecture or experimentation on the poor? Ethnographic snapshots'

Karen Freire, Gustavo Borba, Luisa Diebold, 'Participatory design as an approach to social innovation'

Vera Damazio and Gabriel Leitao, 'Design against domestic violence'

http://desphilosophy.com/dpp/dpp_journal/journal.html


 

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